Publishers

What Happened to Creative Subscription Marketing for Magazines?

By: John Morthanos

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As an outspoken advocate of newsstand sales and someone with experience in circulation marketing, I find there is a correlation between the loss of newsstand sales and the reduction in creative direct response subscription marketing.

Sure, today there is a heavy reliance on internet sales … whether it is going through online subscription agents including Amazon.com, Magazine-Order.com, or the publisher’s home page. But the effort to reach out and “touch” real people is lost completely on these digital channels, and in doing so, selling the concept of a magazine and its contents is also lost.

Magazines Aren't Selling Themselves Well Online

Go to a website of interest … let’s say you’re looking for a leek soup recipe as I did this morning. I found over 6 million potential sites that have this recipe. Go to any of the sites and if it is not a specific magazine site like Martha Stewart for example, there is no obvious promotion to a specific magazine or a site to subscribe to. One site had ads for a furniture company, a national chicken brand. The Martha Stewart page did have one ad for three magazines for “just $10” … but no promotion for specific titles or how they will help make you smarter, thinner, happier, more satiated, or whatever.

At the bottom of the site there is a listing of approximately 10 titles sold by Meredith and AllRecipes.com (part of the Meredith Women’s Network), but no pizzazz, bang, direction to the wonders of the magazine or its contents. Just a listing of 10 titles. The site provided no reasons to go to a store to thumb through an issue and see if it is for you. Nothing to impel you to buy the magazine, or in the words of the classic 1973 National Lampoon subscription ad, “If You Don’t Buy This Magazine, We’ll Kill This Dog.”

The National Lampoon ad created a great deal of buzz. It got rave reviews and a great deal of hate mail. It was publicized in daily newspapers and national magazines, and in the end, it drove consumers to newsstands to see what this magazine was all about. It also sold subscriptions -- a big win for the creative circulation team.

Looking Back at the Creative Subscription Offers of the Past

When I was hired in 1983 to be on the circulation creative services team for the newly formed Ziff-Davis Computer Division, Karen Weinstein, the art director, and myself were given the task to create ads that would spur interest in the new line of personal computers that sat on a desk top. The purpose was to generate excitement for a new industry, new magazines, and develop the groundwork for the future of personal computing. This was the vision of Larry Sporn, the president of the Computer Division and Carole Mandel, the VP of circulation.

Karen and I created the ads. As we called it she was the music, I was the words. These campaigns opened consumers’ eyes to personal computing and created a buzz that made Ziff-Davis the leading computer publisher in the U.S.

In 1984 IBM was planning to release PC Jr. computer for the home. Larry and Carole tasked Karen and myself to come up with a direct mail and print campaign for the magazine product that would accompany this computer launch.

Little did we know that we would be opening a crystal ball to the future by doing a simple visual ad with limited copy predicting home networking, banking from your bedroom, recipe collection, or game playing. We created the buzz, sold the magazine, and got paid subscriptions for a full year.

Successes like this were not only limited to the ingenuity of the Ziff-Davis computer magazine management, but to most domestic magazine publishers.

Direct mail campaigns, print ads, and cross promotions built title awareness that reached across all demographics. Whether it was the cross-promotion with Maxell Video Tapes and Video Review magazine in 1988, where each Maxell VHS tape had a “mini-mag,” offering a trial subscription and a promo code for selective retailers that sold the magazine at a discount. This worked so well, and demonstrated to Maxell that women were also buying VCR tapes, that it opened up new avenues for Madison Avenue to run video tape ads in magazines like Ladies’ Home Journal and Redbook. It also increased our circulation for Video Review.

A promotion in 1978 with Campbell’s Soup and Marvel Comics helped the newly reformed Marvel to reach new audiences, and was the germ of a growing business.

An End to Direct Response Subscription Marketing?

I’m sorry to say we don’t see these types of promotions anymore. I cannot remember the last direct mail package I have received for any magazine. Only a few bother to send renewal notices via snail mail. They depend instead on the internet and auto-renew programs.

Open any webpage and you’ll get hit with pop-ups (if you have your ad blocker turned off), and either you click around them or ignore them until the 30-second display has turned off. We see that reliance on digital media has cut into print sales – both for subscriptions and newsstand. I don’t think the reduction in newsstand sales is solely because of digital media. There are people reading in-depth analysis of new urban artists in Juxtapoz Magazine or in-depth critiques on the Battle of Normandy in World War II Quarterly Magazine. These magazines are selling on the newsstand and in their subscription programs. Other magazines are crying foul and it may be because of their reliance on the convenience of the internet marketing and the absence of being creative daredevils.

The loss of creative direct response marketing and the new “breed” of publishing execs who value short term growth and quick decisions to reduce or eliminate print are slowing down growth in today’s print environment.

We see retail venues like Barnes & Noble in the U.S. and Chapters-Indigo in Canada increase the number of print titles, and in some cases, represent the majority of sales for niche publishers. I say this and use the word “niche” because in 1983 PC Magazine was a niche magazine, only to become one of the top selling circulation magazines (both newsstand and subscription), until the audience of PC Magazine used the digital technology it touted and devoured itself.

But digital cannot devour History, Art, Sport and other magazine categories – it can help these categories grow in print by using creative platforms to direct consumers to retail and print subscriptions.


5 Ways Publishers Can Hyper-Target Print Like Digital Marketers

By: D. Eadward Tree

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Marketers’ disgust with online ad fraud has created an opening for our industry, but we’re not ready to take advantage of it. Our out-of-date, out-of-synch approaches to magazine advertising proposals are holding us back from taking advantage of this new opportunity.

Judging from my interactions with advertising sales reps, they’re seeing fewer digital-only RFPs these days and more media-agnostic ones. Marketers who were in the “print is dead” camp now seem intrigued with the ability of print to engage their most valuable prospects. But simply buying ad pages in general-interest magazines is not their idea of effective targeting.

In this environment, niche titles are holding up best because their readership provides a natural target for certain advertisers: An archery magazine is obviously a great place for a bow manufacturer to place its ads. (Still, that manufacturer may be shifting more of its dollars to a programmatic campaign targeted to people who have shopped online for crossbows in the last two weeks.)

These days, our magazines are mostly represented by two types of ad reps, neither of whom is equipped to do the job: 1) Print-only veterans who are out of touch with marketers’ ability to identify their prospects -- and the kind of money they’re willing to spend to reach those prospects. Their idea of targeted advertising doesn’t extend beyond old-school demographic sections, such as women’s or affluent editions. 2) Multimedia reps, who are typically hired for their digital chops and have little, if any, print experience.

Here are five scenarios that illustrate what can happen when we take a millennial’s grasp of hyper-targeting, blend it with an old print dinosaur’s tricks, and add a pinch of imagination:

Challenge #1: The audience for your parenting magazine is too broad for a prospective advertiser that’s mostly interested in affluent parents of teens.

Solution: Place sponsored cover wraps on copies mailed to orthodontists’ waiting rooms. Parents with time on their hands will pick up your magazine because it’s relevant to them, and the sponsor will have plenty of space and attention to make its pitch.

Challenge #2: Exhibit sponsors complain that they’re not meeting enough good prospects at your show.

Solution: Customize the exhibit copies or show guides for pre-registered attendees, enabling your exhibitors to include messages that are targeted to people based on job title, employer, or the break-out sessions they have selected. It could be as simple as inkjetted messages on the cover. Or as complex as using variable data with digital printing to produce individualized versions of the conference schedule. Instead of just “1 p.m.: Exhibit floor opens,” a participant might also see, “Jane, stop by the Acme Rocket booth before 4:30 to pick up your free iPad!” and an invitation to a sponsored roundtable discussion to which only purchasing directors are invited.

Challenge #3: A grill manufacturer is intrigued by your foodie magazine but focuses its advertising on people who are “in market” for a grill.

Solution: Use repurposed content from your magazine to create a downloadable “How To Buy a Grill” guide, with plenty of room for the sponsor to tell its story and perhaps to offer embedded videos. Promote it in the magazine, in the midst of grilling recipes on your web site, via social media, etc. (Whoever said “magazine” advertising has to be about print?) Besides the sponsorship revenue, you might pick up some valuable email addresses and first-party data.

Challenge #4: The grill manufacturer isn’t re-upping the how-to guide campaign because it’s shifting more money to point-of-purchase marketing.

Solution: Create a retailers’ toolbox that is sent to stores selling the clients’ grills. Include printed copies of the how-to guide. Three-hole punch a few of the copies and place them in binders, along with extra information and resources for store employees. Throw in some magazine-branded laminated tip sheets, illustrated with photos of your clients’ grills. Include hang tags that highlight awards or favorable reviews your editors have given to any of the clients’ grills.

Your client probably knows better than you what will work and may be in a better position to execute as well. Fine: Just license your content to the client or sell it copies of your how-to guide.

Challenge #5: Several clients are reducing ads in your regional magazine to put more money into reaching new residents. “Your readers are ‘from-heres;’ we need to talk to the ‘come-heres,’” one advertiser tells you.

Solution: Create an evergreen welcome-to-town guide with repurposed content from the magazine, along with ads targeted to new residents. (Plus a subscription offer and a promotion for your web site, of course.) A lead sponsor could get a back-cover ad that is digitally printed, providing a map from the recipient’s house to the sponsor’s nearest retail location.

You can buy new-movers lists that are derived from month-old change-of-address data. Or work a deal with the local electric or water utility and you could get the copies delivered shortly after people move in.


We're Still Here: Media Buyers Keep the Print Faith

By: Steve Smith

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The magazine industry collectives may not want us to count ad pages anymore (or even ask about them), but surely they’re still here. For the last decade, print ad budgets seemed like an unlocked vault from which digital budgets could steal.

As we’ve covered every new digital channel—social, video, mobile and even rich media (remember that?), we routinely asked media buyers where they expected to reallocate funds from their zero-sum budgets. Depressingly, “print” was the first and almost gleeful reply from a new digerati who saw bloated page rates as the soft underbelly of ad budgets.

Alas, they were right.

Regardless, advertisers and agencies do retain faith in print as a medium—and especially in the print media brands that have built sometimes generations of trust with their readers that go beyond the page. We asked a couple buyers why they’re still here. In other words, why do they still believe in magazines?

Beyond Scale

“There are certain categories where print investment is still quite strong and delivering great programs and results for our clients,” Ginger Taylor White, EVP, Managing Director, Publishing Investment at Amplifi tells Folio:. “Specifically, CPG, food, pharma and auto brands continue to spend in print and are gaining positive ROIs.”

“We don’t consider print to be a reach play—we view it as an ideal opportunity to engage in contextually relevant content,” says Vanessa Watts, EVP of Media at Laughlin Constable. “For our clients, it’s all about context. “One of our healthcare clients is always involved in a local Chicago magazine ‘Top Doctors’ issue. For a different client, who is focused on brides and grooms, bridal magazines are essential to reach this consumer.”

Similarly, White is encouraged by publishers who are launching new titles like The Pioneer Woman and The Magnolia Journalthat are designed to reach audiences across channels. Each have shown that a new media brand can take root on non-print media like a blog or TV series and create new experiences in print.

The Analog Indulgence

In fact, it’s that longing for a less cluttered and more focused alternative to fragmented media that could be print’s best friend. In some sense, White indicates that magazines themselves and their reading experience are the counterpoint or cure for digital.

“Magazines are still that lean back, tangible indulgence,” she says. “For some it is aspirational and for others it is that time to take a deep dive into something they are passionate about. Regardless of what a magazine means to a reader, it’s time that a person takes for themselves.”

And it’s in that special mode of consumption that media buyers are still able to find a quality other media don’t quite provide. It all comes down to engagement, Watts says. “Readers are passionate about the magazine brands they choose to spend time with. Whether in print or digital formats—or even experiential opportunities— that passion comes through and brands can capitalize on having an engaged consumer to message to.”

And yet, the reality is that digital has changed expectations in all media. Print is being held accountable for its impact in an environment that calls a two-second impression of half of a banner ad’s pixels “viewable.” White says that measuring print is now all over the maps. “This is really on a client-by-client basis. Some clients rely on ROI to determine the impact of print, while others rely on MRI reach numbers and Starch data. For some clients we build out programs with specific KPIs and pre-and post-attitudinal studies to gauge success.”

Watts adds that this is one place where digital presence is most helpful to print. “With publishers providing more digital solutions—measurement becomes easier and more robust than say—typical Starch reporting. Obviously traditional methods of media mix modeling also help compare the impact of print with other channels.”

Exporting Trust Beyond the Page

It almost goes without saying now that the key to print media’s survival is not relying on print; or at least not on print alone.

“Diversification is key,” says Watts. “Publishers have to think beyond the page and offer opportunities to engage with readers digitally and in person. Think content, video and in person experiences. Consumers want to engage with brands beyond the glossy magazine. Publishers need to develop innovative solutions to do this and bring brands along for the ride.”

And it’s not just about being everywhere but, for advertisers at least, being a trusted companion on the consumer’s journey. “It isn’t about buying pages, but rather using the brand to speak to the consumer throughout the purchase funnel/behavioral journey,” says White.

And while diversification is critical, this common publishing strategy now more than ever requires editorial discipline applied from the top down.

“Publishers need to remember that they are still selling a brand that consumers trust,” She says. “They need to sell the value of aligning with their powerful brand and how they are able to engage with the consumer. Continue to look at the holistic brand and make sure you are talking to the consumers in a consistent editorial voice across all touchpoints.”


Author: Steve Smith

Source: foliomag.com URL: https://goo.gl/1MwNqR